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Why Report The Happy News?
The Pleasant News Service - Finally... 
A balance to the disaster hungry news media.

I found myself constantly bombarded with bad news. It made me depressed. Was there no good news? Where was the happy news? Then I noticed a trend in the biased media, reporting all the bad news all the time, and turning everything into a "disaster". 

I read this article published June 4th 2004 on CNN.com   The headline read:

Study: More young adults 'disconnected' 
Many neither working nor in school, study says







Why we started the 
Pleasant News Service


WASHINGTON (AP) -- Despite marked improvement in the lives of American children, a new study finds rising numbers of "disconnected" young adults -- those who have no job, are not in school and have not progressed beyond a high school diploma.

The Annie E. Casey Foundation study, offering an annual measure of how children are faring, showed that nearly one in six young adults -- 3.8 million Americans from 18 to 24 -- was not in school or the workplace in 2002.

Still, American children were much better off early this decade than in the mid-1990s, according to a host of indicators: Fewer babies died in infancy, kids were less likely to live in poverty and fewer were dropping out of school.

The report, released Thursday, shows improvements in the lives of children early this decade compared with the mid-1990s.

Between 1996 and 2001, improvements were reported in eight of the 10 indicators that the report uses to measure success. Among those measures: children in poverty, children living with a parent who lacks a secure year-round job and children dropping out of high school.

Disturbing trend
But child advocates flagged what they called a disturbing trend -- 15 percent of 18- to 24-year olds are "disconnected," meaning not in school or the workplace. The number of those young adults grew by 700,000, a 19 percent increase over three years.

"Over 3.8 million disconnected youth face a greater likelihood of bad outcomes, now and in the future, which hold severe implications for our society," said Douglas W. Nelson, president of the foundation, a private research and grant-making concern that focuses on children.

On the upside, 21 states and Washington, D.C., improved on at least 7 out of 10 indicators of child well-being. Thirty-five states and Washington improved on at least 6 out of 10 indicators.

The study linked some of the good news to economic growth and expansion of public programs during the period covered. The data covers years before the economy grew sluggish.

Not all indicators improved. For example, the percentage of low-birth babies increased slightly, as did the percentage of families headed by a single parent.

The report, based on government data, found that between 1996 and 2001:


Infant mortality -- death during the first year -- fell 7 percent, from 7.3 deaths for every 1,000 live births to 6.8 deaths. Despite national progress, the infant mortality rate increased in 11 states and went unchanged in two.

Child deaths declined to 22 out of every 100,000 children ages 1 to 14, from 26 per 100,000. The child death rate increased in five states -- Alaska, Delaware, Kentucky, New Hampshire and Oklahoma.

Teen deaths by accident, homicide or suicide dropped 17 percent. In 2001, there were 50 deaths per 100,000 teens, compared with 60 in 1996.

Births to teenagers fell in every state, leading to a record low. In 2001, there were 145,324 babies born nationwide to girls ages 15-17.

The high school dropout rate fell 1 percent between 2001 (9 percent) and 1996 (10 percent).

Child poverty fell to an all-time low of 16 percent in 2000. It fell 24 percent between 1996 and 2001, declining in nearly every state. More recent data show the rate inching close to 17 percent in 2002.
Two indicators showed negative trends.

More babies are being born dangerously underweight, weighing less than about 5.5 pounds, putting them at risk of developmental problems. In 2001, 7.7 percent of all babies were born at a low birth-weight -- up from 7.4 percent in 1996.

Also, there was an increase, 4 percent, in the percent of families headed by a single parent, between the years 1996 and 2001.

The report found conditions for children the best in Minnesota, followed by New Hampshire, New Jersey, Iowa, Utah, Vermont, Connecticut, North Dakota, Massachusetts and Nebraska.

Conditions were the worst in Mississippi, then Louisiana, New Mexico, Alabama, South Carolina, Arizona, Arkansas, Tennessee, West Virginia and North Carolina.

Copyright 2004 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. 
 
Find this article at: 
http://www.cnn.com/2004/HEALTH/
parenting/06/03/american.children.ap/index.html
 

There was much pleasant news in the article, but the author chose to focus on the negative and always followed any pleasant news that was reported with something bad. If child advocates want to present the bad news to keep their programs running, we want to present the Pleasant News Service to show you that life is better off than is being reported by current media. You can feel better about what you have accomplished.

Using the exact same study and the exact same facts, this is how we thought the article could have been written with a positive viewpoint rather than a negative bias:

Study: American children are much better off. 
Fewer babies died in infancy, kids were less likely to live in poverty and fewer were dropping out of school.

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Finding a marked improvement in the lives of American children, a new study finds rising numbers indicate children are better off than they were 10 years ago.

The Annie E. Casey Foundation study, offering an annual measure of how children are faring, showed that American children were much better off early this decade than in the mid-1990s, according to a host of indicators: Fewer babies died in infancy, kids were less likely to live in poverty and fewer were dropping out of school.

The report, released Thursday June 3rd 2004, shows improvements in the lives of children early this decade compared with the mid-1990s.

Between 1996 and 2001, improvements were reported in eight of the 10 indicators that the report uses to measure success. Among those measures: children in poverty, children living with a parent who lacks a secure year-round job and children dropping out of high school.

On the upside, 21 states and Washington, D.C., improved on at least 7 out of 10 indicators of child well-being. Thirty-five states and Washington improved on at least 6 out of 10 indicators.

The study linked some of the good news to economic growth and expansion of public programs during the period covered. 

The report, based on government data, found that between 1996 and 2001:

Infant mortality -- death during the first year -- fell 7 percent, from 7.3 deaths for every 1,000 live births to 6.8 deaths. 

Child deaths declined to 22 out of every 100,000 children ages 1 to 14, from 26 per 100,000. 

Teen deaths by accident, homicide or suicide dropped 17 percent. In 2001, there were 50 deaths per 100,000 teens, compared with 60 in 1996.

Births to teenagers fell in every state, leading to a record low. In 2001, there were 145,324 babies born nationwide to girls ages 15-17.

The high school dropout rate fell 1 percent between 2001 (9 percent) and 1996 (10 percent).

Child poverty fell to an all-time low of 16 percent in 2000. It fell 24 percent between 1996 and 2001, declining in nearly every state. More recent data show the rate inching close to 17 percent in 2002.

The report found conditions for children the best in Minnesota, followed by New Hampshire, New Jersey, Iowa, Utah, Vermont, Connecticut, North Dakota, Massachusetts and Nebraska.

Are we right? What do you think? 

 

Read the Current Happy News

Finally... 
A balance to the disaster hungry news media.

 

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